Victorian Gold Hallmarks

VICTORIAN GOLD HALLMARKS : GOLD FLEXIBLE BANGLE

Victorian Gold Hallmarks

victorian gold hallmarks

    victorian

  • A person who lived during the Victorian period
  • of or relating to Queen Victoria of Great Britain or to the age in which she ruled; “Victorian morals”
  • a person who lived during the reign of Victoria
  • priggish: exaggeratedly proper; “my straitlaced Aunt Anna doesn’t approve of my miniskirts”

    hallmarks

  • A mark stamped on articles of gold, silver, or platinum in Britain, certifying their standard of purity
  • A hallmark is an official mark or series of marks struck on items made of precious metals — platinum, gold, silver and in some nations, palladium. In a more general sense, the term ”” can also be used to refer to any distinguishing characteristic or trait.
  • A distinctive feature, esp. one of excellence
  • (hallmark) a distinctive characteristic or attribute
  • (hallmark) authentication: a mark on an article of trade to indicate its origin and authenticity

    gold

  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies
  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color
  • An alloy of this
  • amber: a deep yellow color; “an amber light illuminated the room”; “he admired the gold of her hair”
  • coins made of gold
  • made from or covered with gold; “gold coins”; “the gold dome of the Capitol”; “the golden calf”; “gilded icons”

victorian gold hallmarks – Sterling Silver

Sterling Silver Honey Amber Victorian Pendant, 18"
Sterling Silver Honey Amber Victorian Pendant, 18"
The history of amber begins about 90 millions years ago in lush green forests in the region of modern day Northern Europe. Trees in these regions produced an aromatic resin, used for protection against woodpeckers, fungus and bark-eating insects. This resin would slowly cascade covering the bark of the tree entrapping organic debris and sometimes live insects along the way. Nearly 40 different species of trees produced this protective resin, accounting for the numerous colors of amber today. Over millions of years, this golden resin produced by pre-historic trees accumulated in many layers in the soil below. With the onset of The Great Ice Age, these forests perished, the soil froze and the fossilization process began creating deposits of beautiful amber. After The Great Ice, melted glaciers flowed on top of the amber deposits, forming the Baltic and North Seas. Due to this geological occurrence, amber found its new home in the sea. The gem spent many thousands of years below 100 feet of sand at the sea bottom. After violent sea storms, various lumps of amber would separate and float among the waves, eventually reaching the shore to be discovered by man. The Aisti people were the first to pick up amber lumps along the Baltic shores 25,000 years ago. Aisti believe that amber was pieces of the Sun that had fallen down to the earth and cherished it as a gift from the heavens.

Honey Amber Collection: The most recognizable color of amber, it can be found in almost every key location where amber is mined: Africa, South America, New Zealand and Eurasia. Depending on location, the age of honey amber ranges from 1-90 millions years old. In essence, honey amber is a time capsule preserving compressed organic matter, such as insects, and even little animals. Known as the “Window to the Past”, honey amber tells many fantastic stories from long, long ago. Cognac (or Honey) is the color most commonly associated with the amber gemstone. When people think of “the color amber”, it is the stone of cognac, or honey, amber that is described. If you were to mix together all the colors of amber on the same palette, you will produce a nice cognac shade. It is a hue often found in golden sunsets of the summer. Inclusions show up very nicely in this shade of amber. Often times, stones are selected merely on how the inclusions reflect light as the jewelry is worn. Amber is a conductor of heat, and provides healing energy if worn close to the skin.

Henry Jones Ltd (Bristol)

Henry Jones Ltd (Bristol)
Article Published in the Illustrated Bristol News 1961.

HENRY JONES was a Monmouth man. He came to Bristol in 1803. He was by trade a baker and not long after his arrival be opened a bakery at 39 and 37 Broadmead. He invented self-raising flour.

This was the foundation of the old-established ‘family’ business of Henry Jones (Bristol) Ltd., the self-raising flour manufacturers, whose head offices, warehouse and factory are now situated in Murray Road, Bedminster, Bristol.

The story of Henry Jones himself lies, of course, in his invention, and more particularly in his efforts over a number of years to get his flour officially recognised by the Admiralty for use on board ship.

It is not known how long Henry Jones took to perfect his method. But it was certainly the culmination of years of experiment. What he did, briefly, was to invent a process of baking without yeast.

His original formula is basically the same as that used by the company today. It brought to Henry Jones, who at the time was the proprietor of the Western Biscuit Bakery, Broadmead, wealth and, on occasions, frustration, too.

On March 11th, 1845, he was granted a patent in England, Ireland and Scotland. Imagine the impact of his discovery. To the housewife of those days yeast was indispensable. It had problems chiefly that it would not keep.

And Henry Jones knew full well that prior to his invention, the housewife could not do her own baking without the use of yeast. He found, therefore, that his flour was easy to sell. People welcomed it.

From the days Henry Jones received three parchment certificates of the patent granted by Queen Victoria by the Grace of God,’ he set about marketing his product with a zest and foresight which matched his untold energy.

He was a shrewd businessman. He mixed with society. He was a keen rider with the fox hounds and he enjoyed country pursuits. So it was that he came to send a case of his flour to the Duke of Beaufort at Badminton, to which he received the following reply from the Duke’s chief cook, Mr. William Turnham Beaufort House, 7th July, 1846.

Dear Sir, You will please to send on receipt of this two cases of your excellent flour; one is for His Grace, the other is for Lord Adolphus Fitzclarence. H.G. has spoken to him and he wishes me to show his man how to work it when on board the Victoria and Albert Yacht, with her Majesty. Lord A.F. is the Commander, by that means Her Majesty is sure to eat Bread made from your flour. Send both cases to me at Beaufort House. I hope you are quite well.

Remaining Yours Truly, Win. H. Tumham.

If Henry Jones wanted influential customers he certainly got them. In less than six months he was appointed purveyor of patent flour and biscuits to Her Majesty. She gave him a Royal Warrant to ‘enjoy all the rights, profits, privileges and advantages during my will and pleasure.’ Henry Jones was established.

The difficulties of making bread overseas by the use of yeast was brought home by the suffering of wounded troops in the Crimea. In hospital ships the bread went bad. No wonder. Yeast could not be kept ‘alive’ and workable through a lengthy voyage.

A letter in The Times from one of the nurses at Scutari, dated January 18th, 1855, told of the hazards of those wounded who were shipped away to make room for newcomers.

She wrote: ‘I suppose all English people can imagine the sour bread which is all that is to be had here and the bad butter, too. A stolen scrape of this is the greatest luxury to a dying man. For want of it, many reject the bread entirely and sink. We have seen this often, nor is it to be wondered at. Nothing but hunger entices us in health to eat the food. Their appetites ought to be tempted to the uppermost but the materials are not to be had.

That letter was written ten years after Henry Jones made his discovery of self-raising flour. It pinpoints the struggle which he had to face before his new baking methods were universally accepted. He waged an even greater struggle with the Admiralty.

Henry Jones, meanwhile, took out an American patent. As a result the first gold medal for the new flour was issued in 1852 to an American firm in Chicago using the Bristol formula.

An advertisement of the day asked this question no doubt thought up by Henry Jones himself : ‘Why is Jones’ patent flour like the sun ? Because they are both original and self-raising and their beneficial effects are alike appreciated n the Palace and the cottage.’

Henry Jones was now a successful man. But in contrast to the many letters of congratulation he received he got nowhere with the Admiralty. And this despite the fact that the advantages of his flour were realised by Sir David Dickson, Medical Inspector of Hospitals for the Navy, and by The Lancet, the medical journal, as early as 1845.

Henry Jones strove to convince the Admiralty that although a diet of ‘maggots, weevils and mouldy biscuits’ may have suited Nelson’s crews, only good bread, decently baked, would satisfy

Henry Jones Flour (Bristol)

Henry Jones Flour (Bristol)
Article published in the Illustrated Bristol News 1961.

HENRY JONES was a Monmouth man. He came to Bristol in 1803. He was by trade a baker and not long after his arrival be opened a bakery at 39 and 37 Broadmead. He invented self-raising flour.

This was the foundation of the old-established "family" business of Henry Jones (Bristol) Ltd., the self-raising flour manufacturers, whose head offices, warehouse and factory are now situated in Murray Road, Bedminster, Bristol.

The story of Henry Jones himself lies, of course, in his invention, and more particularly in his efforts over a number of years to get his flour officially recognised by the Admiralty for use on board ship.

It is not known how long Henry Jones took to perfect his method. But it was certainly the culmination of years of experiment. What he did, briefly, was to invent a process of baking without yeast.

His original formula is basically the same as that used by the company today. It brought to Henry Jones, who at the time was the proprietor of the Western Biscuit Bakery, Broadmead, wealth and, on occasions, frustration, too.

On March 11th, 1845, he was granted a patent in England, Ireland and Scotland. Imagine the impact of his discovery. To the housewife of those days yeast was indispensable. It had problems chiefly that it would not keep.

And Henry Jones knew full well that prior to his invention, the housewife could not do her own baking without the use of yeast. He found, therefore, that his flour was easy to sell. People welcomed it.

From the days Henry Jones received three parchment certificates of the patent granted by Queen Victoria by the Grace of God," he set about marketing his product with a zest and foresight which matched his untold energy.

He was a shrewd businessman. He mixed with society. He was a keen rider with the fox hounds and he enjoyed country pursuits. So it was that he came to send a case of his flour to the Duke of Beaufort at Badminton, to which he received the following reply from the Duke’s chief cook, Mr. William Turnham Beaufort House, 7th July, 1846.

Dear Sir,

You will please to send on receipt of this two cases of your excellent flour; one is for His Grace, the other is for Lord Adolphus Fitzclarence. H.G. has spoken to him and he wishes me to show his man how to work it when on board the Victoria and Albert Yacht, with her Majesty. Lord A.F. is the Commander, by that means Her Majesty is sure to eat Bread made from your flour. Send both cases to me at Beaufort House. I hope you are quite well.

Remaining Yours Truly, Win. H. Tumham.

If Henry Jones wanted influential customers he certainly got them. In less than six months he was appointed purveyor of patent flour and biscuits to Her Majesty. She gave him a Royal Warrant to "enjoy all the rights, profits, privileges and advantages during my will and pleasure." Henry Jones was established.

The difficulties of making bread overseas by the use of yeast was brought home by the suffering of wounded troops in the Crimea. In hospital ships the bread went bad. No wonder. Yeast could not be kept "alive" and workable through a lengthy voyage.

A letter in The Times from one of the nurses at Scutari, dated January 18th, 1855, told of the hazards of those wounded who were shipped away to make room for newcomers.

She wrote: "I suppose all English people can imagine the sour bread which is all that is to be had here and the bad butter, too. A stolen scrape of this is the greatest luxury to a dying man. For want of it, many reject the bread entirely and sink. We have seen this often, nor is it to be wondered at. Nothing but hunger entices us in health to eat the food. Their appetites ought to be tempted to the uppermost but the materials are not to be had.

That letter was written ten years after Henry Jones made his discovery of self-raising flour. It pinpoints the struggle which he had to face before his new baking methods were universally accepted. He waged an even greater struggle with the Admiralty.

Henry Jones, meanwhile, took out an American patent. As a result the first gold medal for the new flour was issued in 1852 to an American firm in Chicago using the Bristol formula.

An advertisement of the day asked this question no doubt thought up by Henry Jones himself : "Why is Jones’ patent flour like the sun ? Because they are both original and self-raising and their beneficial effects are alike appreciated n the Palace and the cottage."

Henry Jones was now a successful man. But in contrast to the many letters of congratulation he received he got nowhere with the Admiralty. And this despite the fact that the advantages of his flour were realised by Sir David Dickson, Medical Inspector of Hospitals for the Navy, and by The Lancet, the medical journal, as early as 1845.

Henry Jones strove to convince the Admiralty that although a diet of "maggots, weevils and mouldy biscuits" may have suited Ne

victorian gold hallmarks

victorian gold hallmarks

German Lieder in the Nineteenth Century: Routledge Studies in Musical Genres
This book provides a detailed introduction to the German lied. Beginning with its origin in the literary and musical culture of Germany in the nineteenth-century, the book covers individual composers, including Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Strauss, Mahler and Wolf, the literary sources of lieder, the historical and conceptual issues of song cycles, and issues of musical technique and style in performance practice. Written by eminent music scholars in the field, each chapter includes detailed musical examples and analysis. The second edition has been revised and updated to include the most recent research of each composer and additional musical examples.

This book provides a detailed introduction to the German lied. Beginning with its origin in the literary and musical culture of Germany in the nineteenth-century, the book covers individual composers, including Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Strauss, Mahler and Wolf, the literary sources of lieder, the historical and conceptual issues of song cycles, and issues of musical technique and style in performance practice. Written by eminent music scholars in the field, each chapter includes detailed musical examples and analysis. The second edition has been revised and updated to include the most recent research of each composer and additional musical examples.